Dinosaurs Among Us

Dinosaurs Among Us

Here’s the thing, opinions are like assholes: everyone has one. I don’t know personally what each one smells like, and I’m not inclined to find out, but I KNOW what each one has in common.

That being said, I will never assert that anything you see on this page or anything I say is law. Animal rehab, fitness, or anything else I might babble on about is subject to constant scrutiny. There’s no one way of going about it and there’s certainly many ways to screw up. I hope you take the stories and the information I’ve procured and are able to use it to your benefit. I really hope you just read it, really.

Most of what I’m going to post about will deal with raptor rehabilitation. I’ve always loved dinosaurs, first of all, but I never thought I’d end up working with them. Animals have always been a love of mine, from chasing rat snakes through corn fields, to cleaning out horses stalls, to saving mice from house cats; so, I knew they were going to complete my life puzzle as I got older. I chose writing as a major because my school didn’t offer anything specific in the realm of the wild. And writing was my second love in life anyway. I couldn’t NOT do anything with animals, though so I got involved with my local animal rehabilitation center: Tamarack Rehab and Education Center. What I didn’t know was that they were mainly involved with birds. Raptors. Wonderful, intelligent, fierce creatures that soon mystified me more than anything I had ever been close to.

My next post will deal with the history of raptor rehab but I want to touch on a point that often makes me wary of posting too much online: this kind of stuff is controversial. Techniques used on individual birds, the use of education birds as ambassadors, even rehabilitation itself can inspire heated debates. One that I’ve heard most often is to “let nature take it’s course.”

My only words to this is that most of the birds we get in are the result of human influence. The gull wrapped in fishing line, the eagle with lead poisoning, the thousands of birds that are hit by cars; these are not natural occurrences. I like to think that what I do makes up for the damage that we’ve done and much like the revival of both the California Condors and the Bald Eagle, I hope to one day use what I’ve learned to bring other species back from the brink of extinction and to educate the public and younger generations.

I love to see the look on their faces when I tell them not to let anybody tell them they can’t do something because I love dinosaurs, and now I get to work with them.

One of my duties in this field is to show off our ambassador birds and teach people about these amazing creatures. This is Jasper, an Eastern Screech owl. And yes, he is as fierce as he looks. And yes, that is as big as he'll ever get.
One of my duties in this field is to show off our ambassador birds and teach people about these amazing creatures. This is Jasper, an Eastern Screech owl. And yes, he is as fierce as he looks. And yes, that is as big as he’ll ever get.

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